The fake cfu

Recently, I watched a few teachers  make the same mistake that I made half a dozen times in PD last week  It’s the fake CFU (check for understanding).

In the class I was observing the teacher gave a complex set of directions and followed it with a rhetorical question.

Teacher:  I need you to move the binders to the top of the desk and then take out a pencil for the exit ticket.  The exit ticket has five questions on the front, and two on the back, and I want you to use complete sentences for all of the.  Everybody good?”

The kids smile and nod.  Five kids ignore the back of the exit ticket, and eight don’t use complete sentences.

The danger of the rhetorical question is that kids (or adults)  develop a habit  of faking understanding.  Subconsciously, they start to believe that the teacher wants them to look like they understand more than face their confusion and misunderstanding.

My hunch is that breaking this teacher tic will require real time coaching.

Lemov has a nice related post here:

http://teachlikeachampion.com/blog/how-cfu-2-0-is-different/

This sequence from one of Tallulah’s favorite books  shows a perfect example of the fake cfu.  The book is Lilly’s Big Day by the inestimable Kevin Henkes.

 

 

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One Response to “The fake cfu”

  1. Kayli Says:

    That’s what we’ve all been waiting for! Great poisgnt!

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